Review: Jesus and the Eightfold Path (Lavie Tidhar), The Joy of Technology (Roy Gray), Paintwork (Tim Maughan)

Paintwork feat

A review covering three books from three up-and-coming authors (on in Tidhar’s case, fairly well established). Originally published in Vector.

S L Grey – The Mall review

The Mall cover

“Leading duo Rhoda and Dan are less heroic than most. The former has lost a child in the mall whilst scoring coke, and the latter is a socially and emotionally stunted miseryguts who despises his job. Events fling this unwilling pair of misanthropes together in pursuit of the child Rhoda has lost.”

Gary McMahon – The Concrete Grove review

As I sit down to write this review in mid-August, 2011, the riots that have erupted across Britain over the past week have begun to subside, the energies that drove them dissipating in the face of a coherent police response and that most British of demotivators, the weather. But the anger, social exclusion, vanishing economic […]

Gord Zajac – Major Karnage

“DON’T TALK TO HIM ABOUT THE WAR!!!” As the discerning reader might observe from the opening line of this book’s blurb, quoted verbatim above, this is not a novel trading in subtle and elegant prose. No, Major Karnage is a shameless throwback to the days of pulp SF adventure. Gord Zajac is a fiction editor […]

Walter Jon Williams – This Is Not A Game

In the near future, ARGs (Alternate Reality Games) get big. Some – such as those produced by Dagmar, lead writer and planner for Great Big Idea and fondly nicknamed “the puppetmaster” – are so big that they are played by hundreds of thousands of people across the world. As the book opens she is in […]

John Trevillian – The A-Men

There is an argument to be made that it is a difficult time to be writing action-packed fiction with a pulpish bent: more modern forms of entertainment media continue to grow in popularity, and whilst videogame narratives struggle to claw their way out of the ghetto of barely-coherent melodrama and machismo it seems probable that […]

Colin Harvey – Winter Song

A recent collaboration between new genre imprint Angry Robot and the British Science Fiction Association saw all BSFA members sent a free copy of Colin Harvey’s new novel, Winter Song. Vector (the BSFA’s critical journal) editor Niall Harrison and reviews editor Martin Lewis organised a reading group for the novel, and the end of April saw a swathe […]

Paul McAuley – The Quiet War

Back at the outset of August I promised to post one of my book reviews for Vector every Saturday, and then repeatedly forgot to queue up the reviews for the rest of the month. Duh. Here’s the first of the two, of an understated and clever space opera by Paul McAuley. The Overturn, a period […]

Terry Brooks, Edwin David & Robert Place Napton – The Dark Wraith of Shannara

(It occurred to me after writing the review of ‘Feels Like Steven King’ last week that I’d promised to post my Vector reviews online a month or two after they appeared in the magazine itself. That deadline has long since passed for the first three reviews, so I’ll post one on Saturdays for the first […]

Book Review: Steven Deighan & Terry Cooper – Feels Like Stephen King

Steven Deighan has been plugging away in the indie horror scene for almost a decade now, and published his first collection in 2006 (which I reviewed for now-defunct site Yet Another Book Review). It was a promising if unpolished set of stories and I felt it was worth keeping an eye on Deighan’s work. Now, […]